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Delicious scones soon gone!

I love scones however they can cause such debate that I think we should get the pronunciation out of the way now. If you say the title of this post so that it rhymes you have got it right. Done!

The next debate occurs when you want to serve them, cream or jam first? The easy way to resolve that is to serve with butter, but seriously what does it matter? I put jam first as I can then pile as much clotted cream on top as will balance. This is probably not a sensible argument, but it’s the one I am going with.

I have tried a lot of scone recipes but I always go back to this one from a Dairy Council cook book from 1975. It is simple, tasty, and doesn’t have that bicarb taste that can spoil scones.

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Scones
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The recipe here is for plain scones, so perfect to eat with jam. If you want fruit scones reduce the sugar to 1 oz and add 2oz dried fruit just before the milk. If you like to measure in grams use 30g per oz. Scones taste best on the day that they are made but will keep for a couple of days. They do freeze well if you want to make them in advance, just warm through in the oven before serving.
Servings Prep Time
8 scones 15 minutes
Cook Time
12 minutes
Servings Prep Time
8 scones 15 minutes
Cook Time
12 minutes
Scones
Print Recipe
The recipe here is for plain scones, so perfect to eat with jam. If you want fruit scones reduce the sugar to 1 oz and add 2oz dried fruit just before the milk. If you like to measure in grams use 30g per oz. Scones taste best on the day that they are made but will keep for a couple of days. They do freeze well if you want to make them in advance, just warm through in the oven before serving.
Servings Prep Time
8 scones 15 minutes
Cook Time
12 minutes
Servings Prep Time
8 scones 15 minutes
Cook Time
12 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: scones
Instructions
  1. Rub the butter into the flour until it resembles fine breadcrumbs. I grate the very cold butter into the flour with a cheese grater, and then just finish it off with my fingers.
  2. Add the sugar and mix through. If you are using dried fruit add at this stage.
  3. Using a knife stir the milk into the mix until you get a ball of mixture that leaves the bowl clean. Do not add all the milk at once as different batches of flour absorb different amounts of liquid.
  4. Turn the mixture out onto a lightly floured surface. Bring together until smooth with you fingers very gently. Do not knead or the scones will be tough.
  5. Roll out to 2cm thick and cut rounds using a 5cm cutter. Place on a baking tray and bake in a preheated oven 220C/200C fan/425F/gas mark 7 for 12 - 15 minutes. The scones should be golden and sound hollow if you tap on the underside.
  6. Place on a cooling rack immediately so that the scones stay crisp on the outside, and soft in the middle.
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Flapjack is not a pancake!

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Local names can cause much confusion, as proved by a most animated discussion with some lovely friends. It led me to make both on the same day so that I could post a picture on Twitter. I don’t want this to suggest that I am highly opinionated…..

If you are me, British, or from the Commonwealth, then a flapjack is a sweet tray bake made with oats. If you are American you are apparently more likely to use the term for a thick pancake eaten at breakfast time. I love both, however this division by a common language can lead to culinary disappointments, depending on the time of day.

So as they are so useful for snacks here is the recipe that I use for flapjacks.

 

Flapjack is not a pancake!
Print Recipe
A tray bake made from oats. Use a 30g measure for 1 ounce if you are more familiar with them. The basic recipe can be jazzed up with dried fruit. I like 2oz desiccated coconut with two oz sultanas heated in the pan with the butter mix. 2oz dried cherries or cranberries also work well.
Servings Prep Time
12 pieces 10 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30 minutes n/a n/a
Servings Prep Time
12 pieces 10 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30 minutes n/a n/a
Flapjack is not a pancake!
Print Recipe
A tray bake made from oats. Use a 30g measure for 1 ounce if you are more familiar with them. The basic recipe can be jazzed up with dried fruit. I like 2oz desiccated coconut with two oz sultanas heated in the pan with the butter mix. 2oz dried cherries or cranberries also work well.
Servings Prep Time
12 pieces 10 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30 minutes n/a n/a
Servings Prep Time
12 pieces 10 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
30 minutes n/a n/a
Ingredients
Servings: pieces
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat oven to 190C/170C fan/375F/gas mark 5 Grease a tin no smaller that 8"8" and no larger than 9"x12" or the flapjack will be too deep or thin. I use the former so that it is not too biscuit like.
  2. Place butter, sugar, and syrup into a pan and heat gently until melted and smooth. Too high and it will burn.
  3. Take off the heat and add oats and flour. Stir well then press evenly into the tin. Bake for 30 minutes until lightly golden. It will firm up as it cools.
  4. Cut into portions while still warm. Store in an airtight container once completely cold.
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